IIDs in California

IIDs in California

Ignition Interlock Devices can be enforced by California courts in a DUI case. These devices are installed in cars driven by people who have been convicted of driving under the influence in California. An Ignition Interlock Device works like a breathalyzer and is connected to the vehicle’s dashboard and linked to the ignition system. This system is used to prevent and deter drivers from driving under the influence of alcohol.

 

Ignition Interlock Devices (also known as IIDs) are breath alcohol detection systems used to prevent/deter selected drivers from operating motor vehicles under the influence of alcohol. Before a driver can start the engine, he or she must blow into the device, which then analyzes the ethanol alcohol content of the breath using an electrochemical fuel cell to detect concentration. If the device reads that concentration is greater than a preset limit (usually between 0.02% and 0.04% BAC), it triggers the ignition system to lock and prevent the car from starting. If the fuel cell system does not detect a strong alcohol trace, the ignition will trigger without a problem.

 

To deter people from cheating the IID system, manufacturers employ something called a rolling retest. At random intervals after the ignition has been started, the device will require the driver to retest by blowing into the breathalyzer again. (This prevents drunken drivers from having friends take the test for them). If the driver fails the retest or refuses to take the retest, the device records this information and triggers the car horn to beep and the lights to flash. The only way to silence the horn and get the lights to stop flashing is to turn the car off and to retake (and pass) another breathalyzer test. (For obvious safety reasons, the IID never actually shuts down the car engine.)

 

Ignition Interlock Devices must be maintained and calibrated periodically. Drivers who have been court ordered to install these devices must pay for installation and maintenance. IIDs also record and log noteworthy events. If for instance, a driver attempts to remove the IID device or to circumvent it somehow or to impair fuel cell operation, authorities will be alerted and will set punishments accordingly.

 

California law empowers the courts to impose that IIDs be installed in cars driven by individuals who have been convicted of a DUI in California. These stipulations set out in Vehicle Code Section 14601.2, give the California courts the power to require that said individuals drive with IIDs for up to three years.

 

These intrusive devices can make day-to-day living exceptionally difficult. Particularly in California, where it is nearly impossible to work or do errands without a working motor vehicle. The sentencing practices vary widely depending upon the specific court your case is pending in and variables like the circumstances behind your DUI and the county you are facing charges in can have a substantial impact on whether or not you will be required to have an IID installed on your car.

 

Ignition Interlock Devices (also known as IIDs) are breath alcohol detection systems used to prevent/deter selected drivers from operating motor vehicles under the influence of alcohol. Essentially, IIDs work like breathalyzers, but they are connected to the dashboard and linked electrically to the ignition system. Before a driver can start the engine, he or she must blow into the device, which then analyzes the ethanol alcohol content of the breath using an electrochemical fuel cell to detect concentration. If the device reads that concentration is greater than a preset limit (usually between 0.02% and 0.04% BAC), it triggers the ignition system to lock and prevent the car from starting. If the fuel cell system does not detect a strong alcohol trace, the ignition will trigger without a problem.

 

To deter people from cheating the IID system, manufacturers employ something called a rolling retest. At random intervals after the ignition has been started, the device will require the driver to retest by blowing into the breathalyzer again. (This prevents drunken drivers from having friends take the test for them). If the driver fails the retest or refuses to take the retest, the device records this information and triggers the car horn to beep and the lights to flash. The only way to silence the horn and get the lights to stop flashing is to turn the car off and to retake (and pass) another breathalyzer test. (For obvious safety reasons, the IID never actually shuts down the car engine.)

 

Ignition Interlock Devices must be maintained and calibrated periodically. Drivers who have been court ordered to install these devices must pay for installation and maintenance. IIDs also record and log noteworthy events. If for instance, a driver attempts to remove the IID device or to circumvent it somehow or to impair fuel cell operation, authorities will be alerted and will set punishments accordingly.

 

California law empowers the courts to impose that IIDs be installed in cars driven by individuals who have been convicted of a DUI in California. These stipulations set out in Vehicle Code Section 14601.2, give the California courts the power to require that said individuals drive with IIDs for up to three years.

 

These intrusive devices can make day-to-day living exceptionally difficult. Particularly in California, where it is nearly impossible to work or do errands without a working motor vehicle. The sentencing practices vary widely depending upon the specific court your case is pending in and variables like the circumstances behind your DUI and the county you are facing charges in can have a substantial impact on whether or not you will be required to have an IID installed on your car.

 

Our law firm has offices from San Diego to Ventura and our experienced California DUI defense attorneys know the procedures in the local court where your case is pending. The firm of Wallin & Klarich boasts a tremendous track record helping DUI defendants. Contact us today to get your questions answered and to have a case evaluation.